Interview: The Seathmaw Project


Guitarist and composer from Dallas, Geovanni Munoz, has been producing music under the moniker The Seathmaw Project for a few years, and his most recent release is the third full-length album entitled "Inexistence." The album was launched back in December 2017, and brings a poignant scent of melodic death metal.
Munoz answered our questions about his choice behind the project's name, songwriting, and some more. 
What made you go for the name The Seathmaw Project?
At the time of making The Seathmaw Project I was in a band called Inbryo.  Calling it a project made it clear to the band I was inn that it was a side thing and it wouldn’t interfere with that style of music which was Metalcore.  Eventually that band fell apart and I decided to keep the name intact cause of familiarity. Seathmaw is a made up word I thought sounded abstract,  which fits the music quite well in my opinion.
How do you usually describe your music?
As of lately I’ve been calling it a blend of all the sub-genres I like thrown into a mixer and forced to exist side by side. I say forced cause it doesn’t typically exist out in the wild.
What is your writing process like?
It mostly starts with the main guitar riff which branches out into the rest of the song.  Once I have a riff I really like and can’t keep off my head I record it, add drums accordingly, followed by bass, and once it’s sounding good I’ll finish off with the lyrics.  Every now and then I’ll write the lyrics first then add the rest but I would say 95% of the time it all starts with the riff.
Who or what is your inspiration, if you have any?
Metallica is one of them, after I heard “…And Justice For All”  I got myself a guitar and away I went.  James Hetfield could arguably be one of the best riff makers in the world.  Morten Veland of Tristania/Sirenia is another big influence of mine, such an underrated songwriter, his use of space within his arrangements is amazing. A later source of inspiration is The Black Dahlia Murder.

What is your favorite piece on the new album “Inexistence” and why?
I would say the last track “Disconnect”.  It is one of the most balanced songs I’ve ever written, I love everything about it, especially the pre-chorus lyric delivery.  It’s the only song where I go from low to high growl and back on one take, the effect is my voice sounds different cause you can hear the transition in real time.  Typically the lows and his are recorded separately and then mixed, but for this song I wanted a more raw performance. The lyrics are also more personal than the rest of the album. 
What makes “Inexistence” different?
This is my third album and the biggest difference for sure is experience.  I’ve learned so much about music production and composition from trial and error.  This particular album wrote itself, it has a different aura about it, something special I can’t put to words.  It’s a great step in the right direction,  I’m very proud of it.
What should music lovers expect from “Inexistence”?
They should expect an album from a metalhead for metalheads, I blend a lot of different sub-genres so they’re bound to hit something they like.
What kind of emotions would you like your audience to feel when they listen to your music?
Its not happy go lucky music at all, its dark, heavy, fast, slow, melodic. I think Anger, Joy, and Amazement would be appropriate, at least that’s what I feel.
Which do you like most, life in the studio or on tour?
I miss the road more than the studio, there’s so much fun to have out in the road.  The studio is just the studio, while it’s fun to create and record the songs, the real payoff is being able to play them live in front of people. 
Pick your three favorite albums that you would take on a desert island with you.

Easy, I would take Metallica’s “…And Justice For All” , Tristania’s “Beyond The Veil”,  and End Of September’s self titled album.
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